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Faculty Detail    
Name LISA M CURTIS
 
Campus Address LHRB 431B Zip 0007
Phone 205-996-2184
E-mail lmcurtis@uab.edu
Other websites
     


Faculty Appointment(s)
Appointment Type Department Division Rank
Primary  Medicine  Med - Nephrology Assistant Professor
Center  Medicine  Nephrology Res & Trng Ctr Assistant Professor

Biographical Sketch 
Dr. Curtis received her formal education at the University of Florida (UF), receiving bachelor’s degrees in Microbiology & Cell Science and in Chemistry, as well as a doctoral degree in Cell and Developmental Biology. Between her undergraduate and graduate studies, she worked as a Biological Scientist in the laboratories of Dr. Kyle Rarey at UF where she conducted research on the physiology of non-sensory tissues of the inner ear.

Following receipt of her doctoral degree, Dr. Curtis held a postdoctoral training position with Dr. Edward Scott at UF, studying the role of selectins on retinal neovascularization. Upon moving to Birmingham, Dr. Curtis began a second postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Dr. Chris Klug at UAB, where she studied bone marrow stem cells in renal repair. A final postdoctoral training position was in the laboratories of Dr. Paul W. Sanders in Nephrology, where she continued her study of renal repair in acute kidney injury with a focus on renal-derived sources of repair.

During her postdoctoral training, Dr. Curtis was funded by two Institutional T32 training grants and was fortunate to receive a Frederick Gardner Cottrell Postdoctoral Enhancement Award from UAB, an award that was established to foster the training and advancement of individuals interested in academic research. Dr. Curtis is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine where she is continuing her efforts to identify the source of reparative cells in acute kidney injury.

Society Memberships
Organization Name Position Held Org Link
American Heart Association  member   
American Physiological Society  member   
American Society of Cell Biology  member  www.ascb.org 
American Society of Nephrology  member  www.asn-online.org/ 
Association for Women in Science  member  http://www.awis.org/ 
National Kidney Foundation  member  www.kidney.org 
National Postdoctoral Association  current member; past member of Board of Directors  www.nationalpostdoc.org 
The Gerontological Society of America  member   
Women in Nephrology  Council member  http://www.womeninnephrology.org/ 

Research/Clinical Interest
Title
Cellular repair in acute kidney injury
Description
The ability of the kidney to repair itself in response to acute kidney injury (AKI) or after transplantation has long been appreciated however the source of cells that contribute to this process and the signaling mechanisms that are involved have not been clearly defined. Cellular repair in the kidney has been suggested to occur by adult epithelia that de-differentiate, divide and then re-differentiate, or by renal stem cell-derived cellular repair. Data in the literature support both of these mechanisms of cellular repair and it is possible that that they each contribute to repair with the predominant mechanism dependent on the degree or type of injury. No studies have examined these modes of repair in parallel, however. We have developed a novel methodology for the study of cellular repair in a model of AKI that does not bias toward either mode of repair. Using this model system, we have demonstrated that reparative cells may derive from all gross regions of the kidney which may suggest more than one type of reparative cell or more than one niche of a single reparative cell population. Our current research efforts are directed toward examining the following questions: (1) what is the identity of the reparative cells?; (2) where is the niche from which these reparative cells derive?; (3) what signaling induces the migration and epithelial incorporation of these renal reparative cells?; and (4) what is the effect of aging on this repair response? A greater understanding of the cell biology of renal repair by native kidney cells will provide further insight into the design of novel therapies in AKI.

Selected Publications 
Publication PUBMEDID
Ying W, Allen C, Curtis LM, Aaron K, Sanders PW. Mechanism and Prevention of Acute Kidney Injury from Cast Nephropathy in a Rodent Model. J Clin Invest 2012 May 1;122(5):1777-85.  22484815 
Zarjou A, Kim J, Traylor AM, Sanders PW, Balla J, Agarwal A, Curtis LM. Paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells in cisplatin-induced renal injury require heme oxygenase-1. Am J Physiol: Renal Physiol 2011 Jan; 300(1):F254-62. Epub 2010 Nov 3.  21048024 
Curtis LM, Chen S, Chen B, Agarwal A, Klug CA, Sanders PW. Contribution of intrarenal cells to cellular repair after acute kidney injury: subcapsular implantation technique.
American Journal of Physiology, Renal Physiology 295(1):F310-4, 2008.  
18448588 
Curtis LM and Agarwal A. HOpe for contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Kidney International 72: 907-909, 2007.  17914415 
Roberts J, Chen B, Curtis LM, Sanders PW, Agarwal A, Zinn KR. Detection of early changes in renal function using Tc-99m-Mag3 imaging in a murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. American Journal of Physiology, Renal Physiology 293: F1408-F1412, 2007.  17634403 
Guthrie SM, Curtis LM, Mames RN, Grant MB, Scott EW. The Nitric Oxide Pathway Modulates Hemangioblast Activity of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells. Blood 2005 March 1; 105(5):1916-1922.  15546953 
Shiraishi F, Curtis LM, Truong L, Poss K, Visner GA, Madsen K, Nick HS, Agarwal A. Heme oxygenase-1 gene ablation or expression modulates cisplatin-induced renal tubular apoptosis. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2000 May; 278(5): F726-36.  10807584 

Keywords
acute kidney injury, aging, stem cells