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Faculty Detail    
Name KRISTINA M VISSCHER
 
Campus Address CIRC 111D Zip 0021
Phone 205-934-0267
E-mail kmv@uab.edu
Other websites http://www.neurobiology.uab.edu/Visscher_Lab/
     


Faculty Appointment(s)
Appointment Type Department Division Rank
Primary  Neurobiology  Neurobiology Assistant Professor
Secondary  Biomedical Engineering  Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor
Secondary  Psychology  Psychology Assistant Professor
Secondary  Vision Sciences  Vision Sciences Assistant Professor
Center  General Clinical Research Center  Comprehensive Neuroscience Center Assistant Professor
Center  General Clinical Research Center  Ctr for Clinical & Translational Sci Assistant Professor
Center  Vision Sciences  Ctr for Dev Func Imaging (CDFI) Assistant Professor
Center  Vision Sciences  Vision Science Research Center Assistant Professor

Graduate Biomedical Sciences Affiliations
Medical Scientist Training Program 
Neuroscience 

Biographical Sketch 
1998 - BA in Physics from Carleton College
2004 - PhD in Neuroscience from Washington University in St. Louis
2004-2008 - Postdoctoral Fellow at Brandeis University
2008-2009 - Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University
2009-present - Assistant Professor at UAB

Research/Clinical Interest
Title
Cognitive Neuroscience
Description
How is it that we can process the same information in different ways at different times? Humans have a remarkable ability to process inputs from the environment flexibly. Our lab is interested in understanding what brain mechanisms underlie this ability. Evidence suggests that the brainís state before a stimulus is presented may impact the way the stimulus is processed at the time and remembered in the future. We use a variety of tools to better understand this effect. We study human behavior and brain activity using precise behavioral measurements (including psychophysics and tracking of eye movement), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG).

Keywords
attention, memory, older adults, aging, training, ongoing activity, EEG, fMRI, human neuroscience